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Collection 442 - Two Dot, Montana Collection, 1900-1924

Provenance Note: An original hotel register and book of school board trustee's minutes were deposited with Montana State University by Donna Elwood, Harlowtown, Montana on November 22, 1976. On February 27, 1986, Warren Elwood requested the originals to be returned to him as secretary of the Upper Mussellshell Historic Society. After their photoduplication, the originals were given to Elwood and they are presently in the collections of the Upper Mussellshell Museum in Harlowtown, Montana.

Historical Note: Two Dot is a small town in west-central Wheatland County, Montana. It was founded in 1900 when still located in Meagher County and was named for the peculiar cattle brand of George R. "Two Dot" Wilson. A station stop along the Chicago, Milwaukee, St. Paul and Pacific Railroad, Two Dot had a population of 240 in 1912 and had a newspaper, several retail businesses, and the Two Dot Hotel, Brown and Holling, proprietors. School District Fifteen was established in the village in September 1900 and continued in operation under that designation at least until 1924, seven years after Wheatland County was established. For much of the town's history, two variant spellings of the town's name were in use, and the U. S. Postal Service officially changed its branch from "Twodot" to "Two Dot" in 1999.

Content Description Note: The Two Dot collection consists of positive photocopies of the guest register of the Two Dot Hotel, 1901 to 1907 and the minute book of School District Fifteen from 1900 to 1924. The hotel register simply lists names, hometown, and dates of the various guests with occasional financial account information for selected individuals. The minutes record the regular and special sessions of the school board, giving the names of teachers, the call for bond elections, and other personnel and physical plant matters that came to their attention.

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Updated: 10/3/11