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This year is the 34th Annual Bug Buffet.  This display explored the use of creepy critters in food concoctions as not only a potential food source option, but looking towards the past and Native American practices that have used these creatures for centuries. A week long celebration with events were offered by the Health and Human Development. Is this an event you would be able to take a bite out of?

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Pictured above is the snack box sampler from the Bug Buffet. Would you rather try a cookie with crickets added, or popcorn with a sprinklig of crickets?


Read the press release for this Bug Buffet below: 

Week of events planned around 34th annual Bug Buffet

BOZEMAN – Montana State University’s 34th annual Bug Buffet will include a week of events and activities exploring the history of edible insects across western North America and their relation to Indigenous cuisine.

Events will begin with the Bug Buffet itself on Monday, Feb. 28, from noon to 5 p.m. in the Strand Union Building, Ballroom A. President Waded Cruzado will offer welcoming remarks at 1 p.m.

At 6:30 p.m., chef Sean Sherman, founder and CEO of The Sioux Chef, a company promoting Indigenous cuisine, will speak in Inspiration Hall in Norm Asbjornson Hall. Sherman also owns Owamni, an Indigenous restaurant in Minneapolis, Minnesota.

All events are free and open to the public. Individuals with allergies should be aware edible insects can trigger shellfish allergies.

This year’s Bug Buffet menu will include:

  • Pumpkin bread with cricket or mealworm powder.
  • Salsa with scorpions (spicy preparation).
  • Salsa with chapulines (mild preparation).
  • Tamales with black ants.
  • Wild rice, juniper berry sauce, cedar-braised chapulines.
  • Pemmican with sunflower seeds and chapulines.
  • Grasshoppers fried in a marinade.
  • Native American cookie (gluten-free, maize base with cricket powder).

Additional Bug Buffet week events include:

  • Tuesday, March 1 – Jeff Tomberlin, who helps lead the Center for Environmental Sustainability Through Insect Farming at Texas A&M University, will speak about insect farming and circular agriculture at 4 p.m. in the Plant Biosciences Building, Room 108.
  • Wednesday, March 2 — There will be a screening of the PBS NOVA documentary “Edible Insects” in the Procrastinator Theater at 1 p.m. Insect snacks will be available.
  • Thursday, March 3 — Presentations and workshops will be held in the American Indian Hall Great Room by anthropologist Mark Q. Sutton from the University of San Diego; Brian Yazzie, a chef at Owamni in Minneapolis; chef Kay Ann Miller; Jill Flores, MSU executive chef for Culinary Services; and Tomberlin. Walter Fleming, head of the Department of Native American Studies, will provide welcoming remarks. Also, MSU’s dining halls will serve insect dishes based on Indigenous recipes.
  • Saturday, March 5 – The student bug cuisine cook-off will be held in the Hannon Hall teaching kitchen from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Members of the public are welcome to attend.

Sponsors for the week include: The Office of the President; the College of Agriculture; the College of Arts and Architecture; the College of Education, Health and Human Development; the Jake Jabs College of Business and Entrepreneurship ; the Norm Asbjornson College of Engineering; the Growing and Sustaining Pathways in Agriculture for Tribal Students project; the Center for Environmental Sustainability through Insect Farming; Peak Protein LLC; an anonymous donor for the Sean Sherman event; and the family of the late Robert Fellenz.

More information on the Bug Buffet and the week’s events can be found at montana.edu/ehhd/thebugbuffet.html.  For questions, contact Florence Dunkel at fdunkel@montana.edu or Holly Hunts at hhunts@montana.edu.

Contact Florence Dunkel at fdunkel@montana.edu or Holly Hunts at hhunts@montana.edu.

 

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Close up of page in Display - Statistic FAOClose up of page in Display - Why eat insects?Close up of page in Display - Ahuahutle, Mexican CaviarClose up of page in Display - Rainfall and EnvironmentClose up of page in Display - Seasonal FluctuationsClose up of page in Display - EventsClose up of page in Display - Insects and human societyClose up of page in Display - Termite harvestingClose up of page in Display - MenuClose up of page in Display - Edible insects through the centuriesClose up of page in Display - Maguey WormsClose up of page in Display - Singing CricketsClose up of page in Display - Species eaten in Central African RepublicClose up of page in Display - The Souix ChefClose up of page in Display - Yansi SayingsClose up of page in Display - red palm weevilClose up of page in Display - PosterClose up of page in Display - Bee keeping around the worldClose up of page in Display - Future prospects for food and feed securityClose up of page in Display - Edible insects by countryClose up of page in Display - key to tribal TerritoriesClose up of page in Display - On the ScheduleClose up of page in Display - Edible insects through the centuriesClose up of page in Display - Ant hill

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