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Collection 2396 - James A. Johnston Papers, 1905-1915

Creator:Johnston, James A.

Provenance Note:The James A. Johnston papers were donated to Special Collections by the Gallatin County Justice Center in the fall of 1979 and separated from accession 2083.

Historical Note:James A. Johnston was born on 18 May 1858 in Bay City, Michigan. He moved to Montana in 1896 where he stayed until his death in 1916. He had one son, Guy, and two daughters, Ollie and Bessie.Johnston was very active in the Bozeman community.He was a member of the Masonic Lodge and the Brotherhood of the American Yeoman. For nearly eighteen years, he owned and operated a grocery store located in the Masonic building. Johnston sold his business in 1914 to Hans A. Strand.His political career began in 1902 when he was elected Alderman for the Fourth ward in the Bozeman city council. He served as Alderman until 1904. In 1908, Johnston ran on the Republican ticket for Clerk of the Court, an office he held until 1912. After he sold his store in town and retired from politics, Johnston opened a country grocery store at the Springhill station on the north line of the Gallatin Valley railway. This business venture was not as prosperous and nearly destroyed him financially. This failing business coincided with his failing health and on 17 April 1916, Johnston died of Bright's Disease (an inflamation of the kidneys).

Content Description Note: The James A. Johnston papers consist primarily of his business records from his grocery store in Bozeman, Montana.The account book from 1905-1914 and the cashbook from 1912-1914 make up most of the collection.A few bills from his failed Springhill station grocery store are also included in the papers.

Contents

Box 1
1. Account Book, 1905-1914
2. Cashbook, 1912-1914
3. Bills from grocery business at the Springhill station, 1914-1915

Contents | Special Collections

Updated: 2/20/09